AKIRA 2000N BEGINNING OF SPRING

Posted in 35MM CAMERAS, TOY CAMERAS by Nicole Gelinas on April 26, 2012

Okay, these are the last four images from my trip to the Bloedel Reserve! Spring has just begun and you can start to see all of the little blossoms on the trees and the grass getting greener and greener by the minute! Also there were a bunch of geese just hanging out below the trees on the fourth photo. I will definitely be returning to the reserve to take more photos during summer and will be taking a different camera to test out. There are so many different places to walk and see that I will have no problem finding something new to photograph.

For this shoot I used the Akira 2000N loaded with Kodak Max, ISO400, Kodacolor print film (35mm) that expired on August of 2001. I am really loving the washed out effect from the expired film on the top two images. It sort of gives them a milky appearance that is really unusual and helps to create a look of visual depth. I will admit that I had to crop the first two images because the viewfinder on this camera is whack. To see an example of the issues I had with the viewfinder on the Akira 2000N see this post. If you are interested in seeing more photos taken at the Bloedel Reserve using the Akira 2000N visit my two other posts Lurking in the Shadows and Foliage by the Pond.

AKIRA 2000N LURKING IN THE SHADOWS

Posted in 35MM CAMERAS, TOY CAMERAS by Nicole Gelinas on April 23, 2012

I often find myself very attracted to shadows created by trees. The way that the light spots in the deep shade is just really beautiful to me. I also love when a shadow from a tree juts across the landscape and really creates interest and depth in the photo. I feel that these images really capture the spirit of the Northwest as you often find yourself enclosed in the shadows of the foliage.

For these shots I used the Akira 2000N loaded with Kodak Max, ISO400, Kodacolor print film (35mm) that expired on August of 2001. I was very delighted to see that there actually was quite a bit of detail in the shadow areas of the photos! To see a few more photos and learn more about the specs of this camera please visit my other post The Foliage by the Pond.

AKIRA 2000N THE FOLIAGE BY THE POND

Posted in 35MM CAMERAS, TOY CAMERAS by Nicole Gelinas on April 18, 2012

These are a few of the photos taken with the Akira 2000N plastic camera. Using this camera is really easy because it is literally point and shoot once you choose the aperture you need according to the weather you are shooting in. There is no focusing on this camera and due to its plastic lens, the photos come out with a very soft focus. Very dreamy and creamy is the way I like to describe it where there are no harsh edges and everything sort of looks like a well rendered pastel drawing! This is an effect that a digital camera just cannot create! Most of these were shot at an f16 or f11. If you would like to learn more about shooting with the Akira 2000N, please visit my previous post for some more info and helpful hints.

For this shoot I used a roll of film that I found at a thrift store for $0.50. It was in its original box, but who knows what kind of life it had before I purchased it! It was a roll of Kodak Max, ISO400, Kodacolor print film (35mm) that expired on August of 2001. It produced really wonderful blue and green colors!

These photos were all taken at the Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island, WA. It is really an amazing place to go and walk around and take some really great photos!

Something I noticed when shooting into the sunlight (see fourth image above) it that it creates a blue hazy/ghosting effect that you can see along the top of the tree where the sunlight was shining through. I don’t know for a fact that this was the cameras doing, but it could have also been an effect of using expired film.

LOMOGRAPHY OKTOMAT CAMERA – HORIZON PHOTOS

Posted in 35MM CAMERAS, TOY CAMERAS by Nicole Gelinas on March 8, 2012

These were taken on my first outing with my lomography Oktomat camera. This camera has eight separate lenses that fire in a set sequence using 35mm film. By having the eight lenses fire, you get eight little mini photos all in one frame! The camera itself is really simple to use, probably as easy as it gets. All you need to do is load the film and start shooting. There are no settings to worry about (although if you like settings, this camera shoots at a f/8 with a shutter speed of 1/100 sec). The viewfinder is a little flip-up window that really does not do much to help you see what the pictures will come out looking like. Once you get the roll developed, it is like what mamma said, “It’s like a box of chocolates, you never know what you gonna get.” Hah! Some of my images came out with quite a bit of red, but then other times everything was evenly exposed.

HANDMADE DIY 35mm MATCHBOX PINHOLE CAMERA

Posted in DIY, HANDMADE, PINHOLE by Nicole Gelinas on March 4, 2012

Here are my first photos using a matchbox pinhole camera. These cameras are very inexpensive and really easy to build. You probably already have the materials you need in your junk drawer!

These images might not be the best reproductions as I did not have a film scanner when I developed these. I used a light tracing box and a macro lens on my digital camera to take pictures of the negatives and then inverted the digital image in Photoshop. I still love the results though! The white streaks you are seeing are from a light leak in the camera that I built. I actually don’t mind them as they sort of give the images character and a ghostly spirit affect. As far as the really dark edges, I am not exactly sure why it did not expose the whole negative, other than I might need to make my pinhole a tiny bit larger to expose more of the film area.

Just like with any camera the aperture size does matter in terms of what will be in focus or not. The cool thing about pinhole photography is you can get your foreground and background to infinity into focus if you keep the pinhole very small. Remember the smaller the pinhole, the sharper the images will be!

There is no viewfinder, you literally just point the camera in the direction of your subject and expose the film. You won’t really know what to expect until you see the images!

There are ways to actually calculate how long to expose your film based on the measurements of your pinhole, but it is quite a process, and if you are not very good at math can be kind of confusing. For the images above I just used my “educated guessing skills” and stuck with these guidelines: outside with sun 1-2 seconds, outside and overcast about 5 seconds. Be sure and keep your camera steady as you are exposing the film to get a clear photo.

As far as film, I prefer black and white for pinhole photography, but color film can also be used. For film speeds, I would keep it at iso 100, 200, or 400 to keep some clarity and detail in the photos and it helps to keep the grain low. These photos were shot at iso 400 on Kodak Professional BW400CN film.

If you would like to make your own, here is a stop motion video on how to build a matchbox pinhole camera! If you have any further questions there is a TON of information all over the web that is really helpful! There are also a bunch of different versions of pinhole cameras, but this seems to be the most basic and straightforward design.

 

Don’t forget that there is an annual worldwide pinhole photography day, on the last Sunday in April. This years is on April 29, 2012. Thats only 55 days away! On this day there are a bunch of websites that will allow you to upload your pinhole photography to their sites and celebrate the magic of this simple art form!!